69 Unit 7 Practice and Assessment

Outcome 1

1) Explain the difference between distance and displacement.

2) Explain how velocity relates to position and how acceleration relates to velocity.

Outcome 2

3) An object is thrown into the air and then caught. Assume the speed is slow enough that air resistance is .

a) How much speed does the object lose each second on the way up?

b) What is the speed at the peak height?

c) How much speed does the object gain each second as it falls back down?

d) Are the starting and finishing speeds the same?

e) Are the starting and finishing velocities the same?

 

4) Calculate the on a swimmer moving through water at 0.75 m/s.   The drag coefficient for a human in the position is roughly 0.25. Look up  the of water in standard units and cite your source. Estimate the of a human for this situation by using your own body or average human body measurements (cite your source).

5) The swimmer above is moving at a . What is the size and direction of the average force applied to the swimmer by the water due to their swimming motion?

Outcome 3

6) A toddler runs away from a parent at 0.3 m/s for 3 s, stops for 2 s to see if they are being chased.

a) Draw a vs. time graph for the toddler’s motion

b) Draw an vs. time graph for the toddler’s motion

c) Draw a vs. time graph for the toddler’s motion (you will need to calculate the that occur during each interval in order to draw this graph).

 

7) Upon realizing they might be chased after the 2 s stop, the toddler from the previous exercise begins slowly walking away and increasing speed into a run, reaching a speed of 0.4 m/s only 3 s later.

a) Complete the vs. time graph for the toddler’s motion, now including this new motion. You may draw a new graph or add to your previous graph in a different color. (You will need to calculate the acceleration during this last part of the toddler’s motion in order to complete this graph).

b) Complete the vs. time graph for the toddler’s motion. You may draw a new graph or add to your previous graph in a different color. (You will need to use the acceleration you found above to calculate a change in velocity to complete this graph).

c) Complete the vs. time graph for the toddler’s motion. You may draw a new graph or add to your previous graph in a different color. (You will need to use the acceleration you found above to calculate to complete this graph).

 

8) Describe the motion depicted by the following velocity vs. time graph. The vertical axis tick marks indicate 1 m/s intervals, starting from zero m/s at the horizontal axis.

Velocity in units of m/s on the vertical axis and time in seconds on the horizontal axis. The velocity is 0 from 0 to 2 seconds and then increases linearly from 2-4 seconds. At 4 seconds the velocity becomes constant at 4 m/s until 6 seconds when the graph ends.
Velocity vs. time graph. The vertical axis marks indicate 1 m/s intervals. Image Credit: Uploaded by Riaan at English Wikibooks.

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9) Draw the vs. time graph associated with the vs time graph above.

10) Draw the vs. time graph associated with the previous velocity and acceleration vs. time graphs.

Outcome 4

11) A person with of 65 kg is out walking two dogs when suddenly the dogs pull in opposite directions. Dog 1 pulls with a force of 500 N to the right. Dog 2 pulls with 300 N to the left. In order to stay upright, the person has to run to keep their feet underneath their center of gravity (rather than just keep them planted). Therefore, we will ignore friction.

a) Draw a of the dog walker. Don’t forget to include directions with forces, accelerations, and velocities when answering the following questions.

b) What is the on the dog walker?

c) What is the of the dog walker?

d) What is the velocity of the dog walker after 3 s?

e) What is the average velocity of the dog walker during this 3 s period.

f) What distance will the dog walker have moved in 3 s?


  1. Velocity Graph Uploaded by Riaan at English Wikibooks and transferred from en.wikibooks to Commons., GFDL, is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 4.0

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